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If you’re interested in joining this course (CIS 700-008), you can sign yourself up for the waitlist. Note that the number of spots will be limited.

Course number
CIS 700-008 - Interactive Fiction and Text Generation
Course Description
In this course, we will study how natural language processing is used to develop interactive and creative text applications. We will first cover text adventure games, which are interesting for artificial intelligence research since to succeed at a such games an AI agent needs to understand language, perform common-sense reasoning, and interact with objects in a constrained world. We cover approaches to interpreting user input via a natural language understanding component called the “parser”. We will discuss various strategies for representing a world and modeling how it changes based on user interaction. Next, we will also cover topics like common-sense reasoning tasks, and extracting of narrative structure from stories. Finally, we will discuss natural language generation, both in the context of dialog agents and story generation. We will touch upon human-computer interaction, biases in language models, and other topics.
Website
interactive-fiction-class.org
Instructors
Daphne Ippolito
Chris Callison-Burch
Discussion Forum
Mailing List
Time and place
Spring 2019, Thursdays from 1:30-4:30pm (Towne 327 Active Learning Classroom)
Office hours
by appointment
Grading
TBD. Below is a sample grading rubric, which will change.
There will be three homeworks and a final project. In addition, you will be required to present a paper from the required reading in class.
  • 10% Paper presentation
  • 45% Homeworks
  • 45% Final project
Collaboration Policy
Unless otherwise noted, you ARE allowed to work in pairs on the homework assignments, and teams of 2-4 for the final project.
Late Day Policy
Each student has five free “late days”. Homeworks can be submitted at most two days late. If you are out of late days, then you will not be able to get credit for subsequent late assignments. One “day” is defined as anytime between 1 second and 24 hours after the homework deadline. The intent of the late day policy it to allow you to take extra time due to unforseen circumstances like illnesses or family emergencies, and for forseeable interruptions like on campus interviewing and religious holidays. You do not need to ask permission to use your late days. No additional late days are granted.